anime lamb

can't take the otaku out of the girl

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Heroes on Patrol: Robin Character Analysis

The best part of the series was not the action or the style, but watching the Teen Titans develop and come into their own, as characters we’ve come to adore and enjoy, and watching their distinct personalities bounce off of each other. Across five seasons, we see the Titans at their ‘greenest’ probably shortly after their team was newly formed and they still have to get used to each other, get along with each other, work out their relationships. By the end of the series, they feel more like a legitimate family than a group of teenagers who happen to all share super skills. The depth of character and their interactions play out more and more strongly as the stakes get higher and higher (throughout the season arcs). All five of the Teen Titans were developed fairly equally. Each one received the spotlight several times throughout the series, so it was easy to pick favorites. So here, we can explore these characters and how they developed over series.

Additionally, in Teen Titans, unlike most superhero stories, the team maintains their superhero identities at all times. Really, most of the characters chosen don’t really have any use for secret identities — Starfire, Beast Boy, Raven, and Cyborg — I mean as Raven points out, Beast Boy has fangs, pointed ears, and green skin. The series rarely subtly hints at the characters’ alternate egos (in the episode “Deception” (S03E01) Cyborg takes on the name ‘Stone’ when he goes on an undercover mission in the H.I.V.E. — a reference to his given name in the comics, Victor Stone.)

Robin the leader and one of the five founding members of the Teen Titans. Former protege of Batman, Robin in this iteration is very similar to The Dark Knight. Robin is serious, focused, no-nonsense, and a natural born leader. Robin is the first to cry “Titans, go!” when villainy rears its head, and does most of the delegating for the team. Having been trained by Bruce Wayne, Robin, despite not having super powers, is a master in hand to hand combat, fights with a wide range of gadgets, explosives, and his bowstaff. He is also a great detective and strategist; his logical mind makes him a good tactician and he is able to maximize the team’s efficiency and power by playing their strengths. Robin’s charisma and experience working under Batman makes him a nominal leader, a position which he takes to naturally.

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Filed under robin dick grayson richard grayson batman teen titans dc comics warner bros cartoon network review

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kamen-rider-rahbito:

IN WHICH I WRITE A VERY LONG POST ABOUT WHY MIYAZAKI IS NOT WRONG 
tl;dr:
If you unironically call yourself an otaku, you’re lumping yourself in with some of the least-respected members of society in Japan, and you shouldn’t be surprised/outraged when a well-respected member of Japanese society looks down on you.
The things otaku like are off-putting, and because the anime industry makes most of their money from otaku, the anime industry in general is off-putting.
The anime industry should probably be restructured so that otaku have less power to decide what gets animated, otherwise the anime industry will collapse because NOBODY LIKES IT.
Gimme your lunch money, nerds.
Uh, he never implied masturbation is as bad as war. He’s being a cranky old man, as cranky old men are wont to do. The author of the article just listed those things as additional things Miyazaki doesn’t like.
And something you people really, really, REALLY need to understand is that "otaku" is not a term of endearment in Japan the way “nerd” has become so in the West. If I were to speculate, I’d say it has a lot to do with cultural values - here, we place a lot of value and pride in our individual identities, but that just is not the case in Japan. They, and the East Asian countries in general, place a lot of value in working to improve the collective. Being an otaku implies a lot of the things you’d think being the classical “nerd” implies - living in your mother’s basement, spending all your time watching anime/slacking off, and being a general drain on society. While that’s not “accepted” in the West per se, it is not directly contradictory to every cultural value we have. We’re just expressing our identities when we do those kinds of things. In Japan, they are the antithesis of a praiseworthy member of society.When the anime industry is, in Miyazaki’s mind, full of these kinds of people, who seal themselves off in insular groups and jack off to 2D waifus all day in between drawing said 2D waifus, that is a real problem.
Frankly, when I look at the entire catalogue of anime titles released over the past 5 years, I see what he means. Who the fuck is going to buy OreImo except lolicon siscon hentai otaku? Who the fuck is going to buy K-On! except ronery NEETs? I LOVE the Monogatari Series - but who the fuck is going to buy that shit except social rejects? 
Real-life people do not act like the people in those shows.Real people do not say to their friends/rivals in love “hey, let’s take a shower together while I fondle your tits.” Real sisters do not fall in love with their oniichan desu~s after many sessions of counseling. I love the tsundere archetype, but a real-life tsundere is someone that nobody wants to be around because they treat other people like shit.
I probably should devote an entire paragraph to lolis. (Most) people do not sexualize little girls, and in fact find the sexualization of of little girls to be repulsive. Why, then, are there so many lolis in anime? Because lolis represent a lot of things that a lot of men find desirable in women - innocence, petite bodies, cuteness in general. But for whatever reason, it has become not only okay, but the norm for anime to have prepubescent girls in compromising sexual positions. If you like flat chests - fine. If you like inexperienced girls - fine. If you like cute things - fine. Mashing all of those things together on a 12-year-old and slapping a bikini on her to appeal to otaku with those preferences? Most people will say that is fucked up. 
Fanservice is off-putting to a lot of people. Incest is off-putting to a lot of people. Lolis are off-putting to a lot of people. Unbelievable characters and character interactions are off-putting to a lot of people. But those things are things that self-proclaimed otaku audiences embrace, so that’s what the Miyazaki-proclaimed otaku in the industry draw. Because animation studios make so little money off of anything but DVD and merchandise sales, and otaku are the only people who buy that stuff, the anime industry of late has become inbred and stale at best, and offensive and pedophilic at worst.
Miyazaki is well-loved, both in the West and in the East. But he is not well-loved because his works are made for otaku. I’ve never seen anything he’s made, but the sense I get is that he’s loved in the mainstream because he tells stories that resonate with a hell of a lot of people. The problem he sees in the anime industry is that their works tend only to resonate with otaku, and otaku are not acceptable members of society in Japan. From what I’ve seen of what’s been released and been popular the past few years, I cannot blame him for thinking the way he does.

kamen-rider-rahbito:

IN WHICH I WRITE A VERY LONG POST ABOUT WHY MIYAZAKI IS NOT WRONG 

tl;dr:

  • If you unironically call yourself an otaku, you’re lumping yourself in with some of the least-respected members of society in Japan, and you shouldn’t be surprised/outraged when a well-respected member of Japanese society looks down on you.
  • The things otaku like are off-putting, and because the anime industry makes most of their money from otaku, the anime industry in general is off-putting.
  • The anime industry should probably be restructured so that otaku have less power to decide what gets animated, otherwise the anime industry will collapse because NOBODY LIKES IT.
  • Gimme your lunch money, nerds.

Uh, he never implied masturbation is as bad as war. He’s being a cranky old man, as cranky old men are wont to do. The author of the article just listed those things as additional things Miyazaki doesn’t like.

And something you people really, really, REALLY need to understand is that "otaku" is not a term of endearment in Japan the way “nerd” has become so in the West. If I were to speculate, I’d say it has a lot to do with cultural values - here, we place a lot of value and pride in our individual identities, but that just is not the case in Japan. They, and the East Asian countries in general, place a lot of value in working to improve the collective. Being an otaku implies a lot of the things you’d think being the classical “nerd” implies - living in your mother’s basement, spending all your time watching anime/slacking off, and being a general drain on society. While that’s not “accepted” in the West per se, it is not directly contradictory to every cultural value we have. We’re just expressing our identities when we do those kinds of things. In Japan, they are the antithesis of a praiseworthy member of society.When the anime industry is, in Miyazaki’s mind, full of these kinds of people, who seal themselves off in insular groups and jack off to 2D waifus all day in between drawing said 2D waifus, that is a real problem.

Frankly, when I look at the entire catalogue of anime titles released over the past 5 years, I see what he means. Who the fuck is going to buy OreImo except lolicon siscon hentai otaku? Who the fuck is going to buy K-On! except ronery NEETs? I LOVE the Monogatari Series - but who the fuck is going to buy that shit except social rejects? 

Real-life people do not act like the people in those shows.Real people do not say to their friends/rivals in love “hey, let’s take a shower together while I fondle your tits.” Real sisters do not fall in love with their oniichan desu~s after many sessions of counseling. I love the tsundere archetype, but a real-life tsundere is someone that nobody wants to be around because they treat other people like shit.

I probably should devote an entire paragraph to lolis. (Most) people do not sexualize little girls, and in fact find the sexualization of of little girls to be repulsive. Why, then, are there so many lolis in anime? Because lolis represent a lot of things that a lot of men find desirable in women - innocence, petite bodies, cuteness in general. But for whatever reason, it has become not only okay, but the norm for anime to have prepubescent girls in compromising sexual positions. If you like flat chests - fine. If you like inexperienced girls - fine. If you like cute things - fine. Mashing all of those things together on a 12-year-old and slapping a bikini on her to appeal to otaku with those preferences? Most people will say that is fucked up. 

Fanservice is off-putting to a lot of people. Incest is off-putting to a lot of people. Lolis are off-putting to a lot of people. Unbelievable characters and character interactions are off-putting to a lot of people. But those things are things that self-proclaimed otaku audiences embrace, so that’s what the Miyazaki-proclaimed otaku in the industry draw. Because animation studios make so little money off of anything but DVD and merchandise sales, and otaku are the only people who buy that stuff, the anime industry of late has become inbred and stale at best, and offensive and pedophilic at worst.

Miyazaki is well-loved, both in the West and in the East. But he is not well-loved because his works are made for otaku. I’ve never seen anything he’s made, but the sense I get is that he’s loved in the mainstream because he tells stories that resonate with a hell of a lot of people. The problem he sees in the anime industry is that their works tend only to resonate with otaku, and otaku are not acceptable members of society in Japan. From what I’ve seen of what’s been released and been popular the past few years, I cannot blame him for thinking the way he does.

Filed under anime miyazaki hayao miyazaki otaku

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When There’s Trouble You Know Who to Call: Teen Titans Review pt. II

image

When There’s Trouble You Know Who to Call: Teen Titans Review pt. II

Story Arcs

Teen Titans is formatted with half season arcs. One large story will be told in about five episodes spread out through the 12 episode run. The rest are devoted to mostly character focused development stories. The quality of the main plots vary, even within one season, some being excellent, others having their moments, but ultimately weaker than some of the stand alone episodes.

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Filed under teen titans review cartoon network robin starfire raven cyborg beast boy comics DC comics

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When There’s Trouble You Know Who to Call: Teen Titans Review pt. I

image

When There’s Trouble You Know Who to Call: Teen Titans Review pt. I

Series

Teen Titans is the beloved and nostalgic series of the 2000s about teenage superheroes. The show was based off of the DC comics of the same name, primarily the run of stories titled The New Teen Titans from the 1980’s. Teen Titans was created by Japanese American animator, Glen Murakami (also known for his work on Batman Beyond and Ben 10: Alien Force).

The Teen Titans are five young superheroes: Starfire, a bubbly superalien from the planet Tamaran, Beast Boy, a green, pointy-eared changeling with the power to transform into any living (or extinct) animal, Raven, an empath and witch born to the incarnation of all evil, Cyborg, a half human half machine tech genius who shouts “Booyah!”, and Robin, who, despite not having super powers remains the cool, driven and respected leader of the team. The five teenagers live in Titans Tower and protect Jump City against criminals and evil.

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Filed under teen titans cartoon network robin starfire raven cyborg beast boy review comics DC comics

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Space Dandy Episode 1 (FIRST IMPRESSIONS) – It sure is dandy

popculturesocialclub:

Space dandy anime

Dandy.

A dandy guy in space.
Space Dandy Episode 1 Review
Live With the Flow, Baby
Nagare nagasarete ikiru jan yo
流れ流されて生きるじゃんよ

It’s finally upon us. Many people are a bit too hyped, and while it was number 1 on my most anticipated anime of this season, I can’t say I’m as hyped as some people are. Nonetheless, this is one of the only times that an anime is targeting the west as the audience in a major way. So, how does it play out?

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Filed under anime toonami space dandy anime review

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Objectification vs wish fulfilment: Hypermasculinity in videogames - abridged

uninhibitedandunrepentant:

Over the last few days I have seen a lot of discrepancy between an understanding of male and female representation within videogames. So I decided to do a condensed version of my three thousand word paper on hypermasculinity in the gaming arena for your reading pleasure.

Firstly, let’s discuss the difference between wish fulfilment characters and objectified characters. Or, rather, positive male representations, and sexualised female representations. A wish fulfilment character represents something to which an individual aspires, or admires. It is a representation of the ideal, the positive, the desired (no not sexually, you infants). Whereas objectified characters are stripped of their autonomy. They do not exist for themselves, or for what they might represent. They exist for the pleasure and convenience of those who are acting upon them. They are, as per the word, objects, not people. And don’t you dare tell me that male characters in videogames are also objects because I will ignore you because you are being deliberately stupid and I have no time for such nonsense.

So: Wish fulfilment characters are generally good, idealised representations of power and positivity. Objectified characters are generally just… well. Objects.

Male protagonist characters in videogames are almost always wish fulfilment characters. Female protagonist characters in videogames are almost always objectified characters. And yes, there are exceptions to the rule, but those are exceptions to the rule.

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Filed under gaming video games feminism hypermasculinity wish fulfullment sexualization pink games laura croft

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The Five Best Anime of 2013

Filed under anime 2013

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TOONAMI DECEMBER MOVIES ANNOUNCEMENT:

Hey #toonami faithful! We’re back with some more good news. This December, Toonami will have a whole MONTH of movies to ring in the holidays! We’ll release the full air schedule soon, but for now, here are the GREAT movies we’ll be airing:

12/7- AKIRA- Yup. The most influential anime film of all time is coming to Toonami and kicking off a month of movies. That promo will be something to see, we’re tellin’ ya. By the way, the 25th anniversary remastered Blu-Ray was just released by our friends at Funimation, and man. It’s gorgeous.

12/14- SUMMER WARS- directed by Mamoru Hosoda, this modern classic is something we’ve had our eye on for a while. We think you’ll love it!

12/21- FULL METAL ALCHEMIST- THE CONQUEROR OF SHAMBALLA- FMA fans know how great this gem is. And so do we. Produced by Bones, the same studio who will be bringing you SPACE DANDY in January!

12/28- TRIGUN: BADLAND RUMBLE- Trigun is back where he belongs on Adult Swim, in a special one off adventure.

More details to come, and we hope you’re as excited about this holiday season as we are!

xoxoxoxo

Love, the Toonami crew.

(Source: dearlambie)

Filed under anime toonami trigun summer wars akira Fullmetal Alchemist